Return to VNFAWING.com Website Return to Main Forum Index PageReturn to VNFAWING.com Website
:: Forum Index :: Zephyrnet Forums :: FAQ :: Search :: Memberlist :: Groups :: Register :: Profile :: Log in to check your private messages :: Log in ::
Various F/A-22 - F-35 Av news articles...
Goto page 1, 2, 3 ... 20, 21, 22  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    VNFAWING.com Forum Index -> Military Systems, News, Articles, & Announcements
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
CAG Hotshot

Admin, Site Owner, Developer, Webmaster
 

Rank: Admin, Site Owner, Developer, Webmaster

Joined: 12 Aug 2004

Posts: 16082

Post subject: Various F/A-22 - F-35 Av news articles... Reply with quote
Quote:
October 6, 2004: More details have come out about the "losing" performance of U.S. F-15Cs (from the Alaska-based 3rd Wing) against India's air force in the Cope India air-to-air combat exercise earlier this year. The Air Force and some members of Congress have used the "failure" to justify the need for new F/A-22 and F-35 fighters. Some are calling the results a demonstrated weakening of American air combat capabilities

Two factors have been cited as major reasons why the 3rd Wing took a drubbing. None of the participating American aircraft had the latest long-range AESA radars, although some of the F-15Cs of the Wing had this equipment. A decision had been made beforehand not to send the AESA equipped planes to India due to the additional maintenance package required to support them. A total of six F-15Cs were sent to India, each equipped with a fighter data link, short-range AIM-9X heat-seeking air-to-air missiles, and the U.S.'s helmet-mounted cueing system.

Secondly, at India's request, the U.S. agreed to mock combat at 3-to-1 odds and without the full range of capabilities of simulated long-range radar-guided AIM-120 AMRAAM missiles. U.S. fighters could not use the active on-board radar capability of the AMRAAM, and the missile was limited to around 32 kilometers range and required the use of the F-15C's onboard radar to target Indian aircraft. In standard use, AMRAAM has a range of over 100 kilometers and is a fire-and-forget missile that doesn't require additional guidance from the F-15. Practiced tactics by the F-15 crews mix two AESA-equipped F-15Cs with two stock aircraft. The AESA aircraft take long-range missile shots to thin out and disrupt the formation of a numerically superior force before the two sides close up for closer fighting.

The F-15s flew in groups of 4 against packages of 12 Indian Air Force aircraft consisting of a mix of Mirage 2000, Su-30, Mig-21, and Mig-27 aircraft. The Mirage and Su-30 aircraft were used in the air-to-air role, while the Mig-27 was used as the strike aircraft with the Mig-21 providing escort to the Mig-27s. The Indians also had a simulated AWACS platform and the use of simulated active radar missiles such as the AA-12 and the French Mica, unlike the F-15Cs. This gave the Indian Air Force a fire-and-forget air-to-air missile capability that the U.S. fighters didn't have, a heavily unrealistic assumption in actual hostilities.

However, the U.S. pilots admitted that they did have problems with the simulated active missile threat and don't normally train against launch-and-leave threats. They also admit they underestimated the training and tactics of the Indian pilots. Indian air force planners never repeated failed tactics and were able to change tactics as opportunities became available, mixing things up and never providing the same tactical "look." Some of the Indian aircraft radars had different characteristics than U.S. pilots had seen on stock versions of the aircraft, including some of the Mirage 2000s.


Additionally, even with these limitations, F/A-22s would have swept the skies clear of all IAF aircraft without loss.

However it is interesting to note the number of handicaps that had to be implemented to give the IAF even a maginal advantage...


CAG out...
_________________
CAG Hotshot
"FAF Shape Meister"
Forum Administrator
FAF/FA-2 Design team
TSH Member/Developer

-------- __@
----- _`\<,_
---- (*)/ (*)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~





Last edited by CAG Hotshot on Sun Dec 17 2:57:40 2006; edited 5 times in total
PostSat Apr 9 16:00:24 2005
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
CAG Hotshot

Admin, Site Owner, Developer, Webmaster
 

Rank: Admin, Site Owner, Developer, Webmaster

Joined: 12 Aug 2004

Posts: 16082

Post subject: Reply with quote
Quote:
F/A-22 Sweeps Tests
10/01/04
John A. Tirpak, Executive Editor


Flying Colors for F/A-22
By all accounts, the F/A-22 fighter breezed through four-and-a-half months of exacting tests—its toughest yet. The Raptor demonstrated that it can handily beat today’s best fighters flown by today’s best crews.

The Air Force has classified the results of the F/A-22’s initial operational test and evaluation (IOT&E), conducted at Nellis AFB, Nev., from late April through mid-September. However, USAF officials said nothing in the testing suggests the aircraft won’t perform any way other than brilliantly in real-world combat.

Gen. John P. Jumper, Air Force Chief of Staff, told Inside the Air Force in August that the IOT&E phase was progressing “with fewer lumps and bumps than I ever thought it would.” He added, “We’re very, very pleased with what we’ve seen so far.” The F/A-22 passes its toughest test. (USAF photo by Ken Hackman)

Air Force officials said the service probably would this fall provide an unclassified synopsis of the test results, after USAF completes all analysis.

The F/A-22 was required to prevail in five broad, live scenarios, each with a number of variations.

In the first, USAF measured the Raptor’s ability to spot, shoot, and destroy an F-16 in a “first look, first kill” test. In the second, two F/A-22s had to destroy a “high-value airborne asset” such as an E-3 Airborne Warning and Control System aircraft defended by four F-15s or F-16s. In the third, two F/A-22s had to protect a B-2 bomber against four F-15s or F-16s. In the fourth, four Raptors had to defend a high-value platform such as an AWACS against eight attacking F-15s or F-16s. In the last, four F/A-22s had to protect four F-117s against eight attacking F-15s or F-16s. Supporting aircraft included the Navy’s EA-6B Prowler airborne jamming aircraft.

Besides winning the engagements, the aircraft had to dodge ground-based air defenses. The Air Force said it flew 188 sorties with six F/A-22s during the evaluation.

The tests were run and “graded” by the Air Force Operational Test and Evaluation Center, headquartered at Kirtland AFB, N.M. The testing looked at not only how effectively the aircraft met its mission but also its reliability, ability to surge, sortie generation rate, mission capable rate, and the number of shots required to destroy an enemy.

Based on the performance of those six F/A-22s, AFOTEC developed models simulating how an entire squadron would fare, and it then measured this performance against requirements. An Air Force spokesman said that the modeling simulates large group flying operations “in sufficient detail to provide accurate estimates of suitability parameters.”

In addition, AFOTEC interviewed pilots and maintainers, adding their views to the quantitative data. AFOTEC ultimately will decide whether the F/A-22 is suitable for Air Force use, the spokesman said. “AFOTEC will determine if the aircraft met or did not meet the criteria [that Air Combat Command] set forth, using these data,” said the USAF spokesman.

The IOT&E tests did not look at the F/A-22’s ground attack capabilities. That mission element will be tested later, as additional munitions are certified for F/A-22 use. However, the first deployed F/A-22s will have the capability to drop the 1,000-pound version of the Joint Direct Attack Munition. The main ground attack weapon for the F/A-22 is to be the 250-pound Small Diameter Bomb (SDB). Each Raptor would have the capability to drop six SDBs.

The F/A-22 is slated to achieve initial operational capability by the end of 2005. Air Force officials said they are confident the Raptor will reach that milestone on time, but they cautioned that they might still see some last-minute technical surprises.

_________________
CAG Hotshot
"FAF Shape Meister"
Forum Administrator
FAF/FA-2 Design team
TSH Member/Developer

-------- __@
----- _`\<,_
---- (*)/ (*)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



PostSat Apr 9 16:02:51 2005
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
CAG Hotshot

Admin, Site Owner, Developer, Webmaster
 

Rank: Admin, Site Owner, Developer, Webmaster

Joined: 12 Aug 2004

Posts: 16082

Post subject: Reply with quote
Quote:
Second Oldest Raptor Off Flight Line After Turbulence Incident During Flight (Posted: Monday, October 18, 2004)
[Defense Daily, Oct. 18, 2004]

By Lorenzo Cortes

The second oldest Lockheed Martin [LMT] F/A-22 aircraft in the Air Force's inventory, Raptor 4003, is temporarily off the flight schedule at Edwards AFB, Calif., due to an incident during a flight maneuver with an F-16 aircraft on Sept. 28.

The aircraft was repositioning during a gun tracking maneuver behind an F-16, Edwards spokesman John Haire told Defense Daily last week. During the maneuver, the pilot experienced turbulence, which resulted in a significant "over G" condition.

The pilot recovered the aircraft and returned safely to base. Haire told Defense Daily that there were no visible signs of damage. An engineering analysis is underway, which is expected to take several weeks.

The F/A-22 program earlier this year entered initial operational test and evaluation (IOT&E) at Edwards (Defense Daily, May 3). F/A-22 training takes place at Tyndall AFB, Fla. A full-rate production decision on F/A-22 from the Air Force could follow the completion of IOT&E.

_________________
CAG Hotshot
"FAF Shape Meister"
Forum Administrator
FAF/FA-2 Design team
TSH Member/Developer

-------- __@
----- _`\<,_
---- (*)/ (*)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



PostSat Apr 9 16:05:51 2005
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
CAG Hotshot

Admin, Site Owner, Developer, Webmaster
 

Rank: Admin, Site Owner, Developer, Webmaster

Joined: 12 Aug 2004

Posts: 16082

Post subject: Reply with quote
Quote:
Defense Advanced Radar-Equipped F-15Cs Develop Cruise Missile Defenses Aviation Week & Space Technology 10/04/2004, page 49
David A. Fulghum Elmendorf AFB, Alaska
F-15Cs with advanced radars develop cruise missile defenses, new long-range tactics
Future Radar
F-15C fighter pilots of the 12th and 19th squadrons here are flying the radar of the future. It uses sensor technology that is to be operational on the F/A-22 Raptor, F/A-18E/F Super Hornet, F-35 Joint Strike Fighter and upgraded F-15E Strike Eagle.

The radar's performance numbers are classified, but the new Raytheon APG-63(V)2 radars, the first that are operational with active electronically scanned arrays (AESA), can see a small cruise missile or an airframe with stealth shaping at around 50 mi., the distance at which the standard F-15C radar would see a manned-fighter target. The sub-scale, cruise missile-like targets that pilots practice against are 12-14 ft. long while an Su-27 is about 72 ft. long and a MiG-29, 57 ft.

Another way to make the comparison, says a long-time Pentagon radar specialist, is: What older radar detect at 50 naut. mi. (its functional combat range) the X-band AESA radar can locate at 100 naut. mi.

But detection range and resolution are not the only two advantages. Also near the top of the list is the V2's ability to track more targets simultaneously. That's important because cruise missiles are typically launched in salvoes.

"Chances are, with a V1 [the standard F-15 radar] you are going to be targeting one or maybe two cruise missiles," says Maj. Mike Benham, the 3rd Wing's chief of advanced programs. "With a V2 you can track multiple targets at the same time and guide multiple Amraams [Advanced medium-range air-to-air missiles] into the targets with greater accuracy."

SINCE THE RADARS were delivered in 2000, these two squadrons, both belonging to the 3rd Wing, have been defining new battle tactics and broadening the numbers and types of targets pilots can meet in combat with confidence. That's part of the reason senior Defense Dept. officials and analysts were startled when it became known that six of the wing's F-15s had been beaten in simulated air-to-air combat in India early this year. Only much later did the Air Force acknowledge that those F-15Cs did not carry the AESA radar. Missile ranges were limited to 20 mi. and fought at odds of 3 to 1.

Each squadron of 18 F-15Cs has half its aircraft equipped with V2 radar, which uses an aperture made up of hundreds of first-generation "brick"-shaped transmitter/receivers about the size of a small candy bar. The next-generation T/R modules are already less than 1 in. square. Greatly reduced energy losses result from putting the transmitter within fractions of an inch of the radiators and low-noise amplifiers, say radar specialists. A total of 3,600 transmitting and receiving elements, grouped into a square in staggered rows, make up its antenna. The combination of an agile-beam AESA and rapid-beam steering enables the radar to simultaneously track many targets and guide missiles to intercept them.


A few Alaskan F-15C pilots, educated in the magic of first-generation AESA radar, have developed the concept of operations and tactics for cruise missile defense.Credit: BRIAN R. WOLFF/BRWOLFF@IIPINET.COM
The radar allows the fighters to find small or stealthy cruise missiles at ranges great enough to intercept and destroy them before they can be seen. But even larger AESA arrays, like those planned for the E-10A multisensor command-and-control (MC2A) aircraft, would push the small-target detection capability out to about 200 mi. It could then tell AESA-equipped fighters carrying AIM-120C-6 air-to-air missiles (specialized for small, relatively slow, cruise missile-size targets) where to look for targets. Previously, only very low-frequency radars could detect a stealth design, but they lacked the precision to steer a missile to it. The X-band AESA radars are designed to do both. The system also sends target location updates to the missile during flight, which increases kill probability.

The major tactical impact of the V2 AESA radar comes from its "multitarget track capability and the ability to guide multiple [AIM-120] Amraams against different targets even when they are widely spaced," says Benham. "Initially, when the V2 hit the street, all it could do was cruise missile defense. It didn't have the combat ID capability [and] a lot of the traditional counter-air capabilities. But software updates have now given it all the capability of the V1 and some extra. And it's more powerful so it has greater detection range."

THE NEW AESA antenna also offers a reduced radar cross section for the F-15C making it harder for a foe to detect.
"With a mechanically scanned antenna, the minute you lock on to somebody, you're pointing that plate at them, and that's a huge radar reflector. If they hadn't seen you before, they would see you then. The AESA antenna plate is mounted at an angle [pointing several degrees toward the ground], similar to the F/A-22, so you have much less RF reflection."

Despite its significant advantages, the V2 uses older technologies that will be replaced in the follow-on V3 radar now in development.

"It requires a tremendous amount of cooling and electricity, so we've had to modify the jets significantly [for] the radar," Benham says. "It requires tremendous cooling and electricity, so [consequently] we've had to modify the jets significantly. [The radar] is also extremely heavy. We had to add 600 lb. of lead ballast to the tail of the airplane to keep the nose from being too heavy. The jet is 1,000 lb. heavier than the standard F-15."

WHILE THERE IS NO major impact on range and fuel consumption, there is a minor penalty in slower maneuvering during air-to-air engagements. However, compensation is being provided with the introduction of the AIM-9X short-range (around 12-16-mi.) missile and the helmet-mounted cuing system.

The V2 AESA array has chalked up an impressive 714 hr. mean time between failures, according to a senior Boeing technician who overseas the radar maintenance. He says the most onerous part of the maintenance job involves moving valves and lines on the environmental control system to allow Air Force technicians access to other areas of the aircraft to perform maintenance.

By comparison, the Raytheon APG-63(V)3 in development now will be the same weight as the V1 mechanically scanned radar, will not require tail ballast and will work better with the existing electrical system. Moreover, the V3 will reduce manpower and equipment requirements to improve the squadron's mobility. A total of 12 Raytheon and Boeing employees maintain the 18 radars, says Tim Flohrschutz, Boeing's logistics support contractor for the V2 radar. The civilian support staff debriefs every mission with the pilots and deploys and goes to war with the squadrons.

Instead of the V2's T/R "brick" modules, the V3 uses the same "tile" modules as those in the APG-79 designed for the Navy's F/A-18E/F Super Hornets. The reduced width, depth and weight of the next-generation tiles take 240 lb. out of the array, Flohrschutz says. "The V3 will also include better self-diagnostics for better supportability."

But even with its older technology, pilots here say they would like to have V2 radars on all their aircraft. In fact, the radar is so effective it has created other concerns.

"THE BIG LIMITATION now is whether we can run the intercept geometry to target all those groups [of cruise missiles] and whether we have enough missiles," Benham says. "Because you see so much, it lets you manage the battlefield much better. You're not worried about missing anyone."

However, it means the F-15Cs will go through their weapons load quickly.
"I would love to figure out a way to put more missiles on the jet," he says. "The F-15 has two weapons stations out toward the wingtips that don't get used. I'd like to find a way to put a couple of Amraam's out there or move the AIM-9s there and put Amraams on the current AIM-9X stations."

Another drawback of fighter radar is its limited field of view. While the V2's view is greater than the standard F-15 radar, it is still not all-aspect. Pilots say they would like a digital radar-warning receiver like the ALR-69A(V) to fill in those uncovered areas.

"It has the disadvantage of being a passive system," Benham says. "If the bad guys don't have their radars on, they probably can't shoot you, but you're not going to find them either [except with the radar]."

Nonetheless, the squadrons' pilots believe their tactics offer little opportunity to be surprised from behind.
"The AESA is a forward hemisphere system," Benham says. "The assumption is that things behind us are friendly. We go forward and sanitize the airspace with our radars. We know no bad guys are there unless they make a wide end-around and then [AWACS] surveillance will pick them up. We might do a defense in-depth where we send a two-ship behind [to trail the main force], but typically we want everyone up front because you've got more radars looking. A target may pop up in front of you, but not behind."

Usually the squadron pairs one aircraft carrying an AESA radar with another that does not. For the most part, the AESA radar, with its ability to pick targets out of clutter, is assigned to look low, while the other scans the higher altitudes.

"With V2, once you've sanitized that low area and figured out who's down there, I can roll it up into the high [area of responsibility] and sanitize it," Benham says. "Even then, the radar will continue to send beams to the low AOR to [monitor] weapons quality tracks. If you have a four-ship [formation], flight leads will have V2s, and the wingmen, V1s. Now you have one V2 looking high all the time and one V2 looking low."

THE 3RD WING'S F-15S also carry a communications device, the fighter data link (FDL), which amplifies the radars' impact. "The biggest thing with V2 is it tracks everything, and when combined with everyone else's data through the FDL, situational awareness is huge," says Maj. Mark Snowden, 3rd Wing's chief weapons officer. "Typically, we will designate one [target] in every group we see beyond shoot range as a weapons-quality track [and broadcast it] to wingmen or anyone else on Link 16 so they can see a 3D picture of what's happening.

"If there are six adversary groups and two aren't being shot, with V2 you can broadcast [location] and shoot them later or hand them off if there are more than you have missiles for," he says.

_________________
CAG Hotshot
"FAF Shape Meister"
Forum Administrator
FAF/FA-2 Design team
TSH Member/Developer

-------- __@
----- _`\<,_
---- (*)/ (*)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



PostSat Apr 9 16:07:29 2005
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
CAG Hotshot

Admin, Site Owner, Developer, Webmaster
 

Rank: Admin, Site Owner, Developer, Webmaster

Joined: 12 Aug 2004

Posts: 16082

Post subject: Reply with quote
Quote:
USAF Blames F/A-22 Mishap on Flight Control System (Posted: Tuesday, April 05, 2005)
[Aerospace Daily & Defense Report, April 5, 2005]

U.S. Air Force investigators have concluded that an F/A-22 Raptor became temporarily unstable in the air and sustained $3.6 million in damage last fall due to a glitch in its flight control system, the Air Force announced April 4.

The Lockheed Martin-built aircraft was conducting a flight-test with an F-16 near Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., Sept. 28 when the mishap occurred. The flight control system is supposed to provide aircraft stability, control and maneuvering agility, but an unspecified "deficiency" in the system allowed the F/A-22 to exceed its G-force and attack angle limits after encountering the F-16's wake, the Air Force said. The Raptor landed safely at Edwards.

No one was injured in the mishap, and the Air Force insisted in a statement that the F/A-22 program, which has accumulated about 7,000 flight hours, has compiled "an overwhelmingly positive safety record compared to past aircraft development programs."

The Air Force did not say whether the flight control system has been modified in light of the incident.

The Air Force has not yet announced the results of an investigation into an F/A-22 crash on takeoff at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., in December (DAILY, Dec. 22). The pilot ejected safely from the aircraft in that incident.

_________________
CAG Hotshot
"FAF Shape Meister"
Forum Administrator
FAF/FA-2 Design team
TSH Member/Developer

-------- __@
----- _`\<,_
---- (*)/ (*)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



PostSat Apr 9 16:08:33 2005
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
CAG Hotshot

Admin, Site Owner, Developer, Webmaster
 

Rank: Admin, Site Owner, Developer, Webmaster

Joined: 12 Aug 2004

Posts: 16082

Post subject: Reply with quote
Quote:
F/A-22 Getting Software Fix for Flight Control System (Posted: Wednesday, April 06, 2005)
[Aerospace Daily & Defense Report, April 6, 2005]

(by) Marc Selinger

The U.S. Air Force is modifying software on the F/A-22 Raptor to remove a glitch in the flight control system.

New aircraft will receive the revised software when they are built in Marietta, Ga., according to the Air Force and prime contractor Lockheed Martin. Raptors built before the problem surfaced will also get the fix, whose cost was described by the Air Force as "minimal."

"The revised software has been through rigorous flight-testing with multiple test pilots, and steps are being taken to provide this revised software to all Raptors in the Air Force inventory," Lockheed Martin spokesman Rob Fuller said April 5.

Air Force investigators recently concluded that a "deficiency" in the flight control system allowed Raptor 4003 to become temporarily unstable during a Sept. 28 flight-test (DAILY, April 5). The aircraft sustained $3.6 million in damage but landed safely.

The Air Force plans to begin fielding the F/A-22 in December. Although currently funded to buy 179 Raptors, the service is seeking to boost that number to as high as 381.

_________________
CAG Hotshot
"FAF Shape Meister"
Forum Administrator
FAF/FA-2 Design team
TSH Member/Developer

-------- __@
----- _`\<,_
---- (*)/ (*)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



PostSat Apr 9 16:08:48 2005
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
CAG Hotshot

Admin, Site Owner, Developer, Webmaster
 

Rank: Admin, Site Owner, Developer, Webmaster

Joined: 12 Aug 2004

Posts: 16082

Post subject: Reply with quote
Quote:
Wynne: QDR won't decide Raptor fate
BY: Richard Mullen, Defense Today
04/14/2005


The 2005 Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR) is not the appropriate forum for determining the size of a specific procurement such as the F/A-22 Raptor fighter aircraft program, according to Michael Wynne, under secretary of defense for acquisition, technology and logistics.

"I don't know that it should be a programmatic document," Wynne said of the QDR, when asked by Defense Today whether the 2005 QDR has the potential to determine or affect the size of the F/A-22 Raptor program.

Each QDR is a review of the nation's defenses conducted every four years by the Department of Defense (DOD) for the president and Congress.

The Raptor program has been under great pressure in terms of it size. DOD said in a selected acquisition report that the current Bush administration proposal is to buy a total of 172 Raptors, down from the previously planned 271 copies. DOD estimates that the administration's proposed cut in the Raptor program would save over $10 billion, an amount that would help offset massive increases in the costs of other DOD programs.

For years, the Air Force has maintained that it needs 381 copies of the Raptor to meet its future requirements. At one time the Raptor program had a goal of buying 750 of the sleek, supersonic-cruise stealth aircraft.

Senior Air Force officials have made the point, repeatedly, that they see the 2005 QDR as an opportunity to make their case for a larger Raptor fleet.

Maj. Gen. Ronald Bath, the top Air Force officer representing that service in the 2005 QDR, said in a February interview with Defense Today that the QDR would afford the Air Force the chance to drive home the Raptor's importance to the U.S. ability to go on enjoying air dominance the world over.

Bath predicted that the Air Force would use the QDR to make the case for its need of 381 Raptors.

Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. John Jumper made similar points only last week before members of the Senate Appropriations Committee defense subcommittee.

"If the number of Raptors is reduced as the proposal exists today, we will be returning [to Congress] with requests for something to fill in for those capabilities," Jumper told senators at an April 6 hearing.

He also made the point at that time that cutting the Raptor, an aircraft produced by Lockheed Martin Corp., might not even end up saving DOD any money.

"If we can't get 380 [Raptors], we'll have to fill in some of those blanks with legacy airplanes. But they'd cost about as much as the F/A-22," he told senators.

Jumper also said at that hearing that Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld had promised to take up the question of the Raptor fleet size in the 2005 QDR.

But Wynne depicted the situation differently yesterday. Although conducted every four years, the QDR really is intended to take a 20-year view of DOD needs, rather than delve into programmatic questions, he said. Moreover, he added, the Air Force submits a budget each year for specific programs, "so it [the QDR] can't be determinative" of a specific programs' size or shape.

_________________
CAG Hotshot
"FAF Shape Meister"
Forum Administrator
FAF/FA-2 Design team
TSH Member/Developer

-------- __@
----- _`\<,_
---- (*)/ (*)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



PostThu Apr 14 19:14:00 2005
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
kaptor

Developer/Moderator
 

Rank: Developer/Moderator

Joined: 14 Aug 2004

Posts: 2638

Post subject: Reply with quote
Quote:
Mirage 2000, Su-30, Mig-21, and Mig-27 aircraft

talk about dissimilar aircraft training!
_________________
FAF/FA-2 FM Wizard

"Oh the horror of the seven engine approach"

Missouri Flag


Half man, half machine, half timebomb.....
PostThu Apr 14 22:36:20 2005
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Yahoo Messenger ICQ Number
CAG Hotshot

Admin, Site Owner, Developer, Webmaster
 

Rank: Admin, Site Owner, Developer, Webmaster

Joined: 12 Aug 2004

Posts: 16082

Post subject: Reply with quote
I tell you what, if the QDR is not the proper arena to determine the size of the F/A-22 force, then what the hell is? That is the reason for the netire review, to determine what forces we need for future opps...

Who is this frigin moron Michael Wynne? Where did he slither out from? I am sure he knows more about what the needs of the USAF are now and in the future then the USAF themselves do... Rolling Eyes

Not! Evil or Very Mad


CAG out...
_________________
CAG Hotshot
"FAF Shape Meister"
Forum Administrator
FAF/FA-2 Design team
TSH Member/Developer

-------- __@
----- _`\<,_
---- (*)/ (*)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



PostThu Apr 14 22:40:31 2005
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
CAG Hotshot

Admin, Site Owner, Developer, Webmaster
 

Rank: Admin, Site Owner, Developer, Webmaster

Joined: 12 Aug 2004

Posts: 16082

Post subject: Reply with quote
Quote:
Quadrennial Defense Review focuses on future

by Staff Sgt. C. Todd Lopez
Air Force Print News

4/25/2005 - WASHINGTON -- The four capabilities the Air Force brings to the joint warfighting environment will be the focus of the service's contribution to the 2005 Quadrennial Defense Review.

Officials in the office of the secretary of defense produce the Quadrennial Defense Review every four years with input from the services. The report details to Congress the anticipated needs of the Defense Department out to about the year 2020.

"The QDR is important to all of the services, … because it looks at what capabilities we have today verses what capabilities we are going to need in the future," said Maj. Gen. Ronald J. Bath, Air Force director of strategic planning. "We do an analysis of that and make (decisions) as to where we are going to invest DOD dollars so that we make sure we have those capabilities when we need them."

The Air Force brings three major operational capabilities to the joint warfighting environment, General Bath said. Those capabilities include global mobility, rapid strike, and persistent command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance -- or "C4ISR."

"Those are the three things we tout as being unique to the Air Force," he said. "But there is one other thing. That is the assets we call our people -- the incredibly ingenious force of Airmen (who) can take those other things and make them applicable wherever and whenever."

Those capabilities together allow the Air Force to contribute to joint air dominance -- control of air and space over any battlefield in any part of the world.

"Air dominance guarantees that whenever we put a Soldier or a Marine on the ground or a Sailor on the seas, the (sky) above him will be safe, and that we will control that," the general said.

Part of maintaining that air dominance is ensuring the Air Force has the right tools to do the job. One of those tools is the F/A-22 Raptor, General Bath said.

"The F/A-22 is part of joint air dominance, as is recapitalizing the force," he said. "One of the things that came about with (the budget) was the decision to stop production of the F/A-22 in 2008. That would mean we have fewer (aircraft)."

Air Force officials said they expect to purchase as many as 381 F/A-22 Raptors, though DOD Program Budget Decision 753 has directed that number be cut back to 179. The F/A-22 Raptor is a multirole fighter and attack aircraft expected to replace all F-15 Eagle aircraft as well as some of the F-117A Nighthawk and A-10 Thunderbolt II aircraft. General Bath said the secretary of defense said everything is "back on the table" for the QDR, and he thinks the Air Force can get those planes back in the budget.

"But we think through this QDR, with everything on the table, our number will stand and the F/A-22 production line will run longer," he said.

Also part of the QDR is the Air Force's focus on "Future Total Force." This concept means a smaller, but more capable Air Force in both people and aircraft. It also focuses on finding new ways to use Guard and Reserve units.

"We know we are going to come down in the total number of airplanes," General Bath said. "We are also moving toward an all stealth and all precision force. As that changes, some of the missions will change. We are also looking at changing the way we utilize the Guard and Reserve. We are not looking at drawing down the numbers of people in the Guard and Reserve, but we are going to have to use them differently. Some of the missions are going to change, some will shift to those missions that are becoming more important as the times are changing."

_________________
CAG Hotshot
"FAF Shape Meister"
Forum Administrator
FAF/FA-2 Design team
TSH Member/Developer

-------- __@
----- _`\<,_
---- (*)/ (*)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



PostWed Apr 27 17:12:22 2005
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
CAG Hotshot

Admin, Site Owner, Developer, Webmaster
 

Rank: Admin, Site Owner, Developer, Webmaster

Joined: 12 Aug 2004

Posts: 16082

Post subject: Reply with quote
Quote:
F/A-22 production cost will decline: Lockheed official
BY: Michael Fabey, Defense News
06/16/2005


Now that the F/A-22 Raptor has received Pentagon approval for full-rate production — and with the first planes slated to reach initial operational capability in December at Langley Air Force Base in Virginia — Lockheed Martin says it has been steadily decreasing the amount it costs to produce the plane.

The first lot of Raptors cost the U.S. government about $180 million per copy, Orville Prins, vice president of business development for Lockheed Martin Aeronautics, said June 14 at the Paris Air Show.

That cost is a “flyaway” or sticker price — it includes engine costs, but not research and development money, Prins said. With research and development costs included, estimates for the plane have been as high as a quarter of a billion dollars per Raptor.

The second lot of planes cost about $165 million per jet and the third about $130 million, Prins reported. The most recent lot cost about $130 million per copy.

“This should flatten out over time,” Prins said. “Hopefully between $100 [million] to $110 million.”

_________________
CAG Hotshot
"FAF Shape Meister"
Forum Administrator
FAF/FA-2 Design team
TSH Member/Developer

-------- __@
----- _`\<,_
---- (*)/ (*)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



PostFri Jun 17 0:01:02 2005
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
CAG Hotshot

Admin, Site Owner, Developer, Webmaster
 

Rank: Admin, Site Owner, Developer, Webmaster

Joined: 12 Aug 2004

Posts: 16082

Post subject: Reply with quote
Quote:
Official Mishap Report: Flight control system problem caused F/A-22 crash

A flight control system problem caused an F/A-22 Raptor to crash on the runway at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., on Dec. 20 2004, according to an Air Force report.

The pilot ejected and sustained minor injuries. The $133.3-million aircraft, assigned to the 422nd Test and Evaluation Squadron at Nellis, was destroyed when it crashed. Additional damage was limited to an arresting cable, runway guide sign, runway light and the runway itself.

The flight control system malfunction was caused by a brief power interruption to the aircraft’s three rate sensor assemblies, which caused them to fail. The assemblies measure angular acceleration in all three axes: pitch, roll and yaw. With three failed assemblies, the F/A-22 is not able to fly, investigators said.

When the pilot shut down engines for maintenance servicing, he left the auxiliary power unit running. Based on technical order guidance, he believed the power unit would supply continuous power to the flight control system. However, there was a less-than-one second power interruption to the assemblies during engine shutdown.

There is no automatic warning of this condition. To discover it, the pilot would have had performed a diagnostic test. The pilot accomplished a successful test before engine shutdown, and because the power unit was on, he believed a second test was unnecessary. (Courtesy of Air Combat Command News Service)

- UPDATE: Read the Executive Summary of the report.(pdf)

- UPDATE: Watch the video simulation of the crash.

_________________
CAG Hotshot
"FAF Shape Meister"
Forum Administrator
FAF/FA-2 Design team
TSH Member/Developer

-------- __@
----- _`\<,_
---- (*)/ (*)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



PostSat Jun 18 21:47:30 2005
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
DukeB-120th

Developer/Moderator
 

Rank: Developer/Moderator

Joined: 11 Oct 2004

Posts: 2338

Post subject: Reply with quote
Quote:


“This should flatten out over time,” Prins said. “Hopefully between $100 [million] to $110 million.”


Mr. Green Very Happy
_________________

FAF Beta Tester
MIL Forums Moderator
O-Club Forum Moderator
Flight Lobby Skin Developer
FAF & FA-2 Testers Forum Moderator
VNFAWING.com Duke's Desk Column
PostMon Jun 20 10:55:59 2005
View user's profile Send private message
DukeB-120th

Developer/Moderator
 

Rank: Developer/Moderator

Joined: 11 Oct 2004

Posts: 2338

Post subject: Reply with quote
Quote:
Northrop Grumman to Expand Capabilities for F/A-22 Raptor
SAN DIEGO, Aug. 2, 2005 -- Northrop Grumman Corporation has begun work on an F/A-22 modernization program that will add capabilities to the aircraft's communications, navigation and identification (CNI) system to enhance network-centric operations for the next-generation, air-dominance fighter weapon system.

The CNI avionics are being developed by the Radio Systems business of Northrop Grumman's Space Technology sector, under contract to Lockheed Martin. When fully developed, the system will enable numerous critical CNI functions for the F/A-22.

A key concept in the U.S. Department of Defense's vision for the future is network-centric warfare, which links sensors, communications systems and weapon systems in an interconnected grid that allows for seamless information flow to warfighters, decision makers and support personnel.

To support this vision, Northrop Grumman's F/A-22 modernization program will ensure that the CNI architecture is compliant with the requirements of the Joint Tactical Radio System program. Northrop Grumman will also add Link-16 capability to the CNI system. Link-16 is a tactical data link that provides greater situational awareness through the jam-resistant transfer of voice and data between battle participants.

"The F/A-22's expanding information capabilities will increase the pilot's ability to engage targets with unmatched battlespace awareness," said Jim Byloff, F/A-22 program director, Radio Systems, Northrop Grumman Space Technology. "Our modernization program will not only reduce the cost of the F/A-22's CNI system, it improves interoperability and increases sharing of unique information from the best sensors in the fleet."

Northrop Grumman's CNI system utilizes sophisticated software-defined radio technology to simultaneously support numerous capabilities such as various voice and data communications, automatic acquisition of fly-to points and friend-or-foe identification. The system can also dynamically reconfigure these functions to support priorities defined by missions. Using software-defined radio technology, Northrop Grumman's CNI system is a fraction of the size and weight of the single-function radios previously required to implement the same functions. This "smart-box" approach allows for increased performance, quicker deployment, higher availability, enhanced scalability and lower lifecycle cost.

The F/A-22 Raptor, the world's most advanced fighter, is slated to reach initial operational capability in December 2005 at Langley Air Force Base, Va. The F/A-22's balanced design of stealth, super cruise speed, supportability and super agility, along with its advanced integrated avionics, will enable combat commanders to change the way future wars are fought -- making them shorter, while saving American and allied lives.

Northrop Grumman Corporation is a global defense company headquartered in Los Angeles, Calif. Northrop Grumman provides technologically advanced, innovative products, services and solutions in systems integration, defense electronics, information technology, advanced aircraft, shipbuilding and space technology. With more than 125,000 employees, and operations in all 50 states and 25 countries, Northrop Grumman serves U.S. and international military, government and commercial customers.



CONTACT: Sudi Bruni
Northrop Grumman Space Technology
(858) 592-3407
sudi.bruni@ngc.com
Provider ID: 00083135 -0- Aug/02/2005 18:37 GMT

Last Updated: August 2, 2005 14:37 EDT

_________________

FAF Beta Tester
MIL Forums Moderator
O-Club Forum Moderator
Flight Lobby Skin Developer
FAF & FA-2 Testers Forum Moderator
VNFAWING.com Duke's Desk Column
PostWed Aug 3 16:46:11 2005
View user's profile Send private message
Eaglesbrew

Assistant Forum Administrator
 

Rank: Assistant Forum Administrator

Joined: 28 Aug 2004

Posts: 707

Post subject: Reply with quote
Quote:
The F/A-22 Raptor, the world's most advanced fighter, is slated to reach initial operational capability in December 2005 at Langley Air Force Base, Va


I thought the first F/A-22s were already delivered and flying in their new squadron? Confused
PostWed Aug 3 18:42:47 2005
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    VNFAWING.com Forum Index -> Military Systems, News, Articles, & Announcements All times are GMT - 6 Hours
Goto page 1, 2, 3 ... 20, 21, 22  Next
Page 1 of 22

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics
You cannot reply to topics
You cannot edit your posts
You cannot delete your posts
You cannot vote in polls




VNFAWING Flight Sim Development Center,Inc. - VNFAWING.com

Powered by phpBB © 2001 - phpBB Group